Thursday, October 13, 2011

Wild Monkey Adopts Kitten

This wild monkey has adopted an abandoned kitten and is caring for him as his own. The long-tailed macaque monkey was spotted in a forest in the Ubud region of Bali, Indonesia, protectively nuzzling and grooming the kitten
Source: EVOLVE Campaigns

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Jim Jones: Door-to-door Monkey Salesman

Mojo Jojo Croons the Shade

Friday, August 12, 2011

Marcos Shoe Whore Denounces God's Phallus

Marcos Corpse Worship

MANILA, Philippines — Officials at the state-run Cultural Center of the Philippines shut an art exhibit on Tuesday after it provoked heated debate as well as threats and hate mail for combining Christian symbols with phallic objects.  The decision by the center’s board of directors came a day after former first lady and art patron Imelda Marcos joined politicians and Roman Catholic church leaders in denouncing the exhibit.

...An introduction to Cruz’s work said it “speaks of idolatry and the deconstruction of neo-deities.”


Thursday, August 11, 2011

Saving Face

A woman who underwent a full face transplant in May after being mauled by a chimpanzee in 2009 revealed her new face in a photo released on Thursday.

Charla Nash, 57, who was photographed in her hospital bed at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, appears dramatically different with a new nose, lips and facial skin.

"I will now be able to do things I once took for granted," Nash said in a statement.

"I will be able to smell. I will be able to eat normally. I will no longer be disfigured. I will have lips and will speak clearly once again. I will be able to kiss and hug loved ones."

Nash was hurt after a friend's 200-pound (91 kg) pet chimpanzee went on a rampage two years ago. She lost her hands, lips, nose and eyes, leaving her blind and disfigured after the attack. The animal was eventually shot and killed by police.

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

India Forbids Monkey Nuptuals

It was a wedding that thousands waited eagerly for since the engagement was announced. Invitations were sent, the details were meticulously labored over, and finally, to the almost-hysteric joy of the crowds, the big day arrived.

In the small village of Talwas, Rajasthan, Raju, a well-known cigarette smoking monkey, and his bride Chinki were married, according to Stuff.

Raju had become a local celebrity after Ramesh Saini, a rickshaw driver, adopted him three years ago when he found the monkey unconscious.

He's been a surrogate son to the childless Ramesh ever since.

"I want to enjoy the feelings of a son's marriage through Raju's wedding." Ramesh told the publication. "We will welcome the bride in our house ... after the wedding with all rituals."
Raju's bethrothed Chinki lived with a priest in a nearby village.

More than 2,000 guests were expected to attend the pre-wedding feast and to watch Raju ride atop a horse in a procession, Stuff reported. The wedding was planned in accordance with traditional Hindi customs, including sacred fires and fragrant incense.

Monkeys are revered by many Hindus, because the deity Hanuman appeared in primate form.
But the carefully made preparations were thrown into havoc by government officials who cracked down on the animal nuptials, because monkeys are technically government property. So marrying a monkey, even to another monkey, is illegal (Yet there were no run-ins with the law at a 2008 monkey wedding in Orissa, another Indian state, that attracted thousands. Nor was there any strife when an Indian man wed a female dog in 2007.)

Two hundred guards from the forest department flooded Talwas on the wedding day after warning that all guests would be arrested. Hundreds of attendees showed up despite the threats, but Raju, Chinki and their owners had fled.

In a final twist, the owners announced that the monkeys married in a secret ceremony deep in the woods. Forest rangers captured the newlyweds, but Ramesh told Stuff that he is confident they will return.

"I know my son Raju, with his wife Chinki, will come back home," Ramesh said. "I will have a big reception for them."

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Chimp Brains Don’t Shrink with Age

"Unlike human brains, chimpanzee brains don’t get smaller as they age, suggesting that pronounced neurological decline is a uniquely human byproduct of our oversized brains and extreme longevity."